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Greenwood Rising: Day Trip to Tulsa

REGISTRATION IS CLOSED FOR THIS EVENT

Adults and families are invited to join McFarlin’s Just Action Team for a day in Tulsa. We’ll visit the Greenwood Rising museum to learn about the history of Greenwood, eat lunch at local restuarant, Fixins Soul Kitchen and experience the current, flourishing Greenwood District. Scroll down to read more about the day’s itinerary and details about museum. Cost for the museum is $10 and lunch will be dutch treat.

CLICK HERE for the children & youth smart waiver

CLICK HERE for the parent resource page

If you have any questions please email khoward@mcfarlinumc.org

Details:

  • The group will leave in McFarlin buses between 8-9am.
  • Those who would like to drive their own vehicle can caravan with us
  • Lunch will be dutch treat at Fixins Soul Kitchen
  • Museum admission for groups is $10/per person & the suggested age is 10 and up
  • We’ll head back to Norman between 3-4pm (exact time tbd)
 

About the Museum: (from Greenwood Rising website)

Greenwood Rising is the specific story of the dignity of a people who turned trials, tribulations, and tragedy into a triumph of the human spirit. Meet the people behind Greenwood’s early success, exploring personal stories of entrepreneurship and bringing Historic Greenwood to life through oral and written histories. Visitors cross the train tracks to meet district founders and learn about Greenwood’s early placemaking, economic rise and daily life for residents in Greenwood.

Visitors will also experience a section of the museum called The Arc of Oppression. This section frames the 1921 Tulsa Race Massacre and subsequent changing fortunes of the community through the lens of a centuries-long period of anti-Blackness in America and systemic oppression grounded in laws and customs, and rooted in social, political, and economic systems.

NOTE: The Arc of Oppression section begins with a content warning that supports visitors with information around recognizing triggers and coping with historical racial trauma. Visitors may enter an “emotional exit” corridor that bypasses potentially triggering content while providing key historical information, or progress into the Systems of Anti-Blackness space.